EHS' livestreamed 'Guys and Dolls' is toe-tapping fun

Deb Hurley Brobst
dbrobst@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 5/10/21

Actors at Evergreen High School want to take you back to 1920s New York City when gambling, gangsters and girls combine to create the musical comedy “Guys and Dolls.” A musical classic, the show …

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EHS' livestreamed 'Guys and Dolls' is toe-tapping fun

Posted

Actors at Evergreen High School want to take you back to 1920s New York City when gambling, gangsters and girls combine to create the musical comedy “Guys and Dolls.”

A musical classic, the show was selected primarily because EHS wanted the ability to perform a livestreamed version, according to EHS choral music teacher and show director Sara Garza. In addition, the performers are doing the shorter concert version, which uses a narrator to move the plot along.

Garza decided to offer the show virtually because she has a few cast members who have been in school remotely, and she wanted to make sure they could participate. A team recorded the actors in person, and then the students participating remotely recorded songs, and Garza melded them together.

“I'm happy we can keep those remote kids included,” Garza said, noting that the cast, crew and orchestra put the show together in a scant six weeks.

“(The students) are happy they are getting to do a show at all,” she said. “They're working their tails off to get everything learned. This is a really motivated group of kids.”

She said while performances could be live because COVID-19 restrictions have opened up, “but I was not willing to compromise on including our remote students.”

The actors, many of whom have been in several EHS musicals in the past, are thrilled that they are getting to perform. Last year, they were told that the school was closing because of the pandemic during intermission of the spring musical “Curtains,” so they only performed that show once.

Senior Paige Montgomery, who plays Adelaide in “Guys and Dolls” and choreographed some of the dances, enjoys the show's family aspect because the students are tight-knit.

“The show is a nice representation of what people should be,” Montgomery said.

Senior Claire Killian, who plays Sarah Brown, said her senior year has been bittersweet, noting how different this school year has been.

“I had a lot of expectations about my senior year and the senior show,” she said. “(This show) is definitely different than I thought it would be.”

She said she likes acting because it allows her to portray someone else, and the show has been fun simply because she's been with the rest of the cast.

“We appreciate it so much more,” she added. “The absence of (performing) makes it more important now.”

Senior Zane Larson said playing gambler Skye Masterson has allowed him to stretch his acting skills. He called filming the show different because scenes weren't done in chronological order.

“When you're on stage, you have live feedback, but when you're recording, you just put it out there and hope they like it,” he said.

Montgomery added that being filmed rather than having a live audience has been weird, though she understood the push to include students who couldn't be at the school in person.

Larson said everyone was happy to be back on stage after a year of being sad.

“I hope (this show) doesn't go unseen,” he said. “It's amazing that it's all coming together so well.”

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