Q&A with Collin Parson

Parson was selected to create a public art project to celebrate Lakewood’s 50th anniversary

Posted 3/13/19

Collin Parson was raised in Lakewood, and to this day, he calls the city home. A former member for Pirate: Contemporary Art, and the director of galleries and curator for the Arvada Center for the …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Username
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution of $25 or more in Nov. 2018-2019, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access Includes access to all websites


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

Q&A with Collin Parson

Parson was selected to create a public art project to celebrate Lakewood’s 50th anniversary

Posted

Collin Parson was raised in Lakewood, and to this day, he calls the city home. A former member for Pirate: Contemporary Art, and the director of galleries and curator for the Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities, Parson was recently selected from over 30 artists to create a public art project to celebrate Lakewood’s 50th anniversary.

Parson’s project will be on display this September at Addenbrooke Park where the Addenbrooke family home used to sit. The only thing remaining from the home, constructed in 1953, is the fireplace.

Parson discussed the “Echoes and Reflections: Lakewood’s 50th Anniversary” art project and more with the Lakewood Sentinel.

What is “Echoes and Reflections: Lakewood’s 50th Anniversary” going to look like?

There’s this old chimney that was once part of the Addenbrooke homestead. I came up with the idea of recreating the echo, or fragments that once stood there. You’ll see the footprint of the house that once stood there. There will be wall sections and windows and a couple of doors of the architecture that was once there. It’s celebrating the fragments of the house, but at the same time reflecting the future.

The ‘reflecting’ is literally mirror polished stainless steel. Basically, they are sculptures. There’s going to be a single bench in the center, and there will be mirror polish underneath it. It will be where the couch was, or where the gathering place would be in a house. It will be the gathering place for the community.

What message do you want people to take away from this?

I hope they see that the footprint and these architectural elements were of the existing homestead. At the same time, it will feel new and reflect the past, yet celebrate the future.

I think it will be a great gathering place and a special place for Lakewood residents and beyond. I think this is going to be something in another 50 year that is kind of honored and cherished as a community.

What does it mean to you to be the artist celebrating Lakewood’s 50th anniversary?

This will be something I’m really proud of. I was raised in Lakewood. This is my home. My wife grew up a few blocks away from Addenbrooke Park. I love that Lakewood is not the urban center of the city of Denver.

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.