Cutting hair and slicing vegetables

Emily Griffith Technical College’s café and salon, barber services are back

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A men’s haircut for as little as $10. A stuffed omelet for about one-half the cost of what a diner charges. A $20 massage.

These are among the many bargains to be had at Emily Griffith Technical College now that the school has reopened Emily’s Café as well as Emily’s Salon and Barbershop after the pandemic caused a two-year absence.

Not only will you save money, you also will help a student learn their craft. Worried about a bad haircut? Certified instructors are in the room, supervising the students.

“It provides students authentic opportunities to run the businesses and have that experience with the public,” said Sara Holzberlein, dean of the College of Creative Arts and Design at Emily Griffith Technical College. “You get the jitters, (but) you have an instructor with you.”

Emily’s Salon and Barbershop offers such services as coloring for $25 to $40, texture services, skin care and nail work. Cosmetology and barbering students deliver all of the services under close supervision.

The school’s salon and barbershop has been servicing clients for a whopping 75 years — Emily Griffith opened her school in 1916. The facilities are open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and again from 5-7 p.m. Walk-ins are welcome and constitute about 20% of customers. However, Holzberlein recommends calling ahead for an appointment.

“We’re very happy to be back, to have the ability to work with the public,” Holzberlein said. “We now have that chance to really hone those soft skills, communication and service, dealing with the public face to face.”

Emily’s Cafe serves breakfast from 8:30-9:30 a.m. and lunch from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays at 1860 Lincoln St.

Culinary arts students cook to order. The breakfast menu includes breakfast burritos for $3.50, pancakes, French toast, made-to-order omelets and more. The lunch menu offers sandwiches, pizza at $4.50 for an 8-inch, a burger combo for $7, a salad bar, soups and daily specials.

“The food here is great,” said student Kyle Lawson, 22, who has worked in restaurants since he was 15. “We make everything fresh. Come in and for just a few bucks, try great food. It’s a great atmosphere and we love to see new faces.”

Lawson is considering buying a food truck and selling tapas from it.

Chef Tim Inzano is in his 24th year as a culinary instructor in the College of Creative Arts and Design. He said that during the time that the café was closed, students adjusted by focusing more on academics and being innovative.

“You’ve got to be creative,” he said. “We wanted people to come in and try out stuff, so we came up with a delivery program. And we learned how to take orders on the phone.”

Meanwhile, activity has picked up and everybody’s back in the classrooms, whether it be to cut hair or slice vegetables. And come June, the school will reopen its massage service, charging just $20 for one hour.

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