Arvada parent publishes picture book with ADHD theme

Victor and the Vroom is first children’s book for Lydia Rueger

Staff report
Posted 1/8/20

“Victor and the Vroom,” the debut picture book by Arvada-based freelance writer and parent Lydia Rueger, features a regular car with a not-so-regular engine. The story is based on Rueger’s …

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Arvada parent publishes picture book with ADHD theme

Victor and the Vroom is first children’s book for Lydia Rueger

Posted

“Victor and the Vroom,” the debut picture book by Arvada-based freelance writer and parent Lydia Rueger, features a regular car with a not-so-regular engine. The story is based on Rueger’s son’s ADHD diagnosis.

Victor looks similar to the other cars in his class, but under his hood is an engine that sounds and performs like no one else’s. His engine helps him do unique and interesting things, but it also causes him to create huge disasters. Try as he might, Victor can’t make his engine sound like the others, so he visits a mechanic to see if he can fix his engine.

The mechanic doesn’t fix his engine but shows him how powerful it can be. His friends help him clean the smudges from his headlights, replace his tires, and fix his breaks, so he won’t create such a big mess, and in the end, they love the sound of his engine, too.

“What a fabulous way to teach young children (and adults) the strengths and challenges of an ADHD mind,” Janine Rosche, lecturer in human development and family relations at the University of Colorado Denver and mom of four, said in a news release. “The author handles the sensitive topics of being different tactfully, celebrating the beauty of a unique mind, without sugarcoating some of the harder experiences.”

Rueger is a mom of two children and freelance writer/editor for Colorado Parent magazine. Her son’s fourth-grade class at Hackberry Hill Elementary offered suggestions for “Victor and the Vroom” last year before it was submitted to publishers. This is her first children’s book. Learn more at www.lydiarueger.com.

Diane Gibbs, a former Colorado resident, was diagnosed with ADHD as an adult while illustrating this book. She’s an award-winning graphic designer, owner of the design firm Littlebird Communications, college graphic design professor at the University of South Alabama, and creator of the video podcast, Design Recharge. She collaged Victor from paper, using the interior patterns from reused business envelopes. Learn more at littlebirdcommunications.com.

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