Time to Talk
11 results total, viewing 1 - 11

Mental illness: ‘It’s not even really a law enforcement problem’

In Castle Rock last year, police responded to 250 calls involving suicidal or potentially suicidal people. Douglas County deputies responded to at least 500 calls related to mental health in 2017, … more

Mental health calls challenge police

In the dark, early-morning hours of New Year’s Eve, Douglas County Deputy Zackari Parrish pleaded through the closed door of a Highlands Ranch apartment with a tenant he believed to be experiencing … more

Mental health holds weigh liberty vs. public safety

When a person in a mental health crisis is an imminent danger to himself, herself or others, or is gravely disabled by a mental illness, mental health and law enforcement professionals may place them … more

Officers learn how to de-escalate situations involving mental illness

Jeff Santelli, a retired Douglas County Sheriff’s Office deputy who now works as a CIT trainer, suggested that CIT should be a specialized presence in law enforcement, likening it to SWAT teams. Just like SWAT officers, CIT officers require a specific skillset, Santelli said. “It’s actually a very similar analogy to CIT,” he said. “It’s a specialized training of communication and not everybody is the best communicator.” more

Culture shift affects jail population

Law enforcement and mental health experts point to a culture shift in the approach to mental health treatment in the 1960s for the drastic rise in inmates with mental illness. In 1963, President John … more

‘All of our jails are psychiatric facilities’

At 17 years old, Michael was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. He also was battling an addiction to heroin. Through his father’s private insurance, he received treatment and medication for both. In … more

Checkups mean ‘I’m more likely to stay sober’

Wearing an orange T-shirt and pants, Samuel Cardona sat at a round table in a small glass-walled room of the Douglas County jail, as he talked to a reporter. It was an afternoon in January. He had … more

Series: Time to talk about mental illness

Don’t we all know someone who is struggling with some form of mental illness or mental health challenge?

Colorado Community Media has launched a series of articles and forums, entitled “Time to Talk,” on the state of mental health, specifically in Douglas County, but applying to all of us, to discuss the need to bring the issue of mental illness into everyday conversation.

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Time to Talk: A shared story across the metro area

One in five adults nationally and in Colorado lives with a mental illness. The number is the same for young people 13 to 18 years old. Mental health experts have found no one is immune from society’s fast-paced, competitive, technology-driven environment. Stressors of work, pressure of academics, the emotional unrest caused by social media — combined with the stigma associated with mental illness and high costs of insurance and treatment — make it difficult to achieve a positive state of mental health, they say. more

Time to talk: Community members form unique mental health partnership

Several Douglas County administrators sat on one side of a large rectangular table. The deputy county attorney was a few seats down, near a deputy from the sheriff’s office. Representatives from … more

Editorial: It’s time to talk about mental health

The hope is that the conversation will not only enable us to reach out to one another, but also help lead to some solutions and ideas that reflect the needs of our families, friends, neighbors and colleagues. In this fast-paced world, we need to care enough to slow down and take a minute to listen. If this isn’t the time to talk, then when will it be? more
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