Mural artist hopes to give Northglenn history tunnel vision

Work on art project set to begin this spring

Posted 2/11/19

When mural artist Chad Bolsinger gets done, the tunnel connecting the city’s Community Center complex and the Wagon Road Park-n-Ride should be a trip through history. “Obviously, we’re …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

E-mail
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution of $25 or more in Nov. 2018-2019, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access Includes access to all websites


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

Mural artist hopes to give Northglenn history tunnel vision

Work on art project set to begin this spring

Volunteer Sharon Whitman talks at a memory station Feb. 5 at the Senior Center. Photos and memories gathered will be used to create a mural honoring the city's 50th anniversary.
Volunteer Sharon Whitman talks at a memory station Feb. 5 at the Senior Center. Photos and memories gathered will be used to create a mural honoring the city's 50th anniversary.
Scott Taylor
Posted

When mural artist Chad Bolsinger gets done, the tunnel connecting the city’s Community Center complex and the Wagon Road Park-n-Ride should be a trip through history.

“Obviously, we’re celebrating 50 years,” Bolsinger said. “So we want to draw attention to the past 50 years — what Northglenn is and how it came to be — while bringing attention to where Northglenn is going.”

Northglenn Arts has selected Bolsinger to design and paint the mural, meant to mark Northglenn’s 50th anniversary. The arts group hosted the photo and memory gathering session Feb. 5 at the Senior Center. Residents were encouraged to stop by with mementos and personal photographs from Northglenn’s history. Staff scanned photos at one station while volunteers talked with residents about their memories of the city, from its early days through the current day.

“We have a theme of space and time,” Bolsinger said. “The old stuff is still there. It’s still alive. We want to pull those memories out and bring them back to life and make walking through that tunnel kind of an experience, something people will go to just to see art.”

Northglenn officially became a city in April 1969 and local officials have planned a series of event to mark the occasion.

Michael Stricker, supervisor of the city’s cultural programs, said the effort settled on the tunnel because it’s a regular route for people attending festivals or events at the community center complex.

“It’s a football field long and we’ll be painting both sides and the ceiling,” Stricker said. “We went through a national call for artists and a citizens committee narrowed it down to three artists and we narrowed it down to Chad.”

It’s being funded by the city and Northglenn’s Arts and Humanities Foundation.

Linda Rouze, who has lived in the area since 1961 — eight years before Northglenn was officially founded — brought a bonanza of photographs. She was nine-months-old when her parents bought their house on 106th place.

“We still have my parents original house,” she said. “When they bought it, it was nine months old and they bought it from a couple that couldn’t have kids. But the neighborhood was full of kids, so they sold it to my folks.”

Her father, George Dunwoody owned Dunwoody Automotive and her children attended Northglenn High School, so her photos and memories cover a lot of time.

“I brought in photos from Northglenn High School, little league and Northglenn Youth Football,” she said. “We brought in some pictures of fishing at Webster Lake. We are friends with Officer Brad Nelson, who used to be a Northglenn cop and one year he went to my son’s Kindergarten class as show and tell. We brought in pictures of that.”

Bolsinger, a Denver resident, has painted some well known murals around the area. They include a silver rhinoceros that was located on the back of some buildings in Denver’s River North — or RiNo — neighborhood and a building-sized image of Albert Einstein along South Broadway.

But this work will feature less abstract imagery than previous works. He hopes to use the images people give the city to create a mural that tells the story of Northglenn from a resident’s point of view.

“It won’t be anything too crazy, but some of my pieces are little more surreal and they liked that,” Bolsinger said. “The town liked the idea of doing something that’s not just standard, `Here’s this landmark and here’s this one,’ They wanted to show some imagination.”

He hopes to begin designing the mural in March, with painting beginning in April and wrapping up a month later.

Northglenn 1969: Memories wanted

The city is still looking for residents photos and memories of the past half-century. You can email them to Northglenn Communications Manager Kimberly Rein at krein@northglenn.org or to Communications Specialist at snettles@northglenn.org.

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.