'Day of Music' is treat for dialysis patients

Classical players appear at 29 DaVita dialysis centers across area

Posted 9/7/18

It's like a part-time job, sitting there for four hours at a time, three days a week, for a routine round of dialysis. The treatment process is difficult and tiring. Often, patients choose to sleep …

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'Day of Music' is treat for dialysis patients

Classical players appear at 29 DaVita dialysis centers across area

Posted

It's like a part-time job, sitting there for four hours at a time, three days a week, for a routine round of dialysis. The treatment process is difficult and tiring. Often, patients choose to sleep through it.

Jim Lacher normally sleeps through his dialysis treatment at DaVita Kidney Care in Parker, but on Sept. 5 the chatty North Dakota native wasn't going to miss DaVita's three guests that morning.

Paul, Clare and Hannah Trainor, of Parker, visited DaVita on a Wednesday morning and played a half-hour mini-concert in the treatment room — 17-year-old Paul, on cello and violin, 15-year-old Clare on harp and 11-year-old Hannah on violin. Paul opened with “Prelude and Fugue No. 1 in C Major” by Johan Sebastian Bach. The concert ended with the trio playing “Ave Maria” by Franz Schubert.

The young musicians approached Lacher after the performance, and talked about the music — the songs he recognized but couldn't place the name of. Hearing the Trainors play reminded Lacher of the songs his son would play. Lacher's youngest son writes classical music, and for the 30 minutes the Trainors played, Lacher felt a connection to him.

“I got to listen to that and think of him,” Lacher said.

Marty Brauer, of Aurora, played the trumpet since fourth grade. He said the playing reminded him of his brother, who plays the cello.

“It's been a while since I heard strings,” Brauer said. “I really enjoyed it.”

Lacher, Brauer and the other 52 in-center patients of the DaVita in Parker spend at least 12 hours a week getting dialysis treatment, a medical procedure to remove toxins from the blood of a patient with failed kidneys.

The siblings' morning concert was part of the “DaVita Day of Music.” In all, 29 of these concerts at DaVita centers were held across the metro area to brighten the days of hundreds of dialysis patients.

“Talking to them … you can tell it brings back memories for them,” Clare Trainor said. “It's nice for us because we get to perform and have that experience playing in front of people.”

For the patients, the peaceful, classical music offered a relief from the general stillness in the center and the occasional beeping from the dialysis machines. Paul Trainor said he enjoyed bringing classical music to them.

“They're going through a lot. You've heard the cliché 'music's a universal language.' It's a cliché for a reason. It's because it is. It's something everyone can enjoy,” Paul said. “Especially these people. They're going through stuff. They're suffering. It's nice to let them forget what they're going through for a moment, because music's transcendent. You make a suffering person smile, and it's a pretty good feeling."

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