Adams County officials call for unity

Examples of cooperation lauded as election winners take their oaths

Posted 1/16/19

Adams County’s newly sworn-in officials made the call for unity and overcoming party differences as they took their oaths of office Jan. 8. “Adams County is a place that believes in the idea that …

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Adams County officials call for unity

Examples of cooperation lauded as election winners take their oaths

Posted

Adams County’s newly sworn-in officials made the call for unity and overcoming party differences as they took their oaths of office Jan. 8.

“Adams County is a place that believes in the idea that only through inclusiveness and collaboration can we solve our greatest challenges,” County Commission Chair Mary Hodge said at the opening of the county’s 2019 inauguration ceremony. “It’s a place where we are able to overcome our differences, see the day with fresh eyes and come together to make progress.”

Family members and well-wishers filled the Waymire Dome on Adams County’s Riverdale Regional Park in Henderson Jan. 8 to watch the winners in November’s election take their oaths of office from Patrick Murphy, chief judge for Colorado’s 17th Judicial district. That included five district and county judges and six county officials.

“We live in a moment in history where government and its ability to function have been called into question, but we reject that cynical view,” Hodge said. “We reject that cynical view.”

New deputy

They didn’t have to look much farther than the Treasurer’s office for an example in cooperation. Brigitte Grimm, the Republican who lost narrowly in November’s race, took the stage to speak on behalf of her former opponent Lisa Culpepper, the Democrat who won the job.

Culpepper didn’t attend the ceremony Tuesday afternoon. She was out of the country on a pre-planned trip and Judge Murphy helped her swear her oath before she left.

But Grimm said she’s accepted a position as Culpepper’s deputy treasurer and she had good things to say about her new boss.

“Lisa has an exciting vision for the treasurer’s office that builds on the foundation that we’ve created in the past eight years,” Grimm said. “She’s energized about the opportunity to expand our services, widen the scope of how we serve you and expand on innovative solutions that work on all of our taxpayers.”

It went back to before the votes were cast, Grimm said. She and Culpepper had agreed to keep their election friendly, avoiding personal attacks.

“We agreed to that we would respect each other’s credentials, each other’s visions and if you paid attention, we never discredited each other,” Grimm said. “It was after the election and we were talking about streamlining the transition process and we realized that her vision was to build on what I’d started.”

It’s a good fit, Grimm said.

“I feel incredibly blessed and honored about her gracious offer to keep me on,” Grimm said.

Principles

While the federal government continues to be shut down, the new officials made cooperation at the county level the theme of the afternoon.

“We cannot measure our success by the other side’s failure,” Commissioner Steve O’Dorisio said in his speech after he took his oath, noting that differences of opinion are not differences of principle.

“So I look forward to working on principles and common goals,” he said. “That includes quality of life, economic opportunity and standing up for the county.”

The candidates sworn in were all part of a blue wave that swept Colorado and Adams County, replacing every Republican in county office with a Democrat. New County Commissioner Emma Pinter pointed to those Democratic Party ideals after she took her oath, calling for an end to racial discrimination.

“In this room, we are fortunate enough to join together in this fight to build an Adams County that is welcoming to all,” Pinter said. “We will need all of us. Too often, equity is met with racism, opportunity is crushed with low wages and a lack of transportation and hope can be derailed by corporate greed an environmental degradation. The problems we are working to solve will shift from day to day but the values we bring need to remain the same.”

Judges

Murphy swore in five judges at the ceremony that voters returned to office in November’s voting: District Judges Jaclyn Brown, Sharon Holbrook, Edward Moss, Donald Quick and County Judge Brian Bowen.

Murphy swore in five other judges earlier in the day. Those five, Michael Cox, Cindy Dang, Byron Howell, Sabino Roman and Dianna Royball, were not able to attend the Jan. 8 ceremony.

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