Requirements stringent for Woodland Park

A day after the two-day rainstorm in July, the Fountain Creek bed is dry between Walmart and the Crystola Inn. Yet there is plenty of water downstream but, obviously, it didn’t come from Woodland Park, the perennial scapegoat in the ongoing controversy over water among Ute Pass communities. Photo by Pat Hill
Pat Hill
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The city of Woodland Park requires that detention facilities hold water volume from the five-year and 100-year storms. “We have stringent requirements in the city, stronger than anybody else in the region,” said City Manager David Buttery. “Most cities only require detaining the 100-year storm.”

The detention-facility system near Woodland Hardware illustrates the concept. “There are two holes, a bottom hole and a top hole and a grate on the top,” he said. “So there are tons of volume that can be stored and it can only release at the flow rate of the five-year or 100-year storm.”

New subdivisions, for instance, can't exceed the historic flow rate. “We're good upstream neighbors; we realize that with the steep terrain we needed to do more, which gives our downstream neighbors significantly more protection.” Buttery said.

In addition to surface detention ponds, some developments such as Park State Bank & Trust use underground storage systems for detention.

In 1994, the city initiated a stormwater capital fee for all new building projects, from single-family homes to subdivisions. “That's why I'm not a big fan of joining this regional stormwater task force because we're being good stewards already,” Buttery said. “With collected fee we have done many projects on Fountain Creek.”