Centennial opens new Eagle Street facility

Complex includes public works, animal services

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The City of Centennial has transformed an abandoned lumber yard into an impressive new complex that beginning this week will house the city’s Public Works, Animal Services and Code Compliance departments as well as Centennial’s 24/7 Citizen Response Center.

The transformation of the former BMC West lumber yard was celebrated at a grand opening ceremony Dec. 19 at the new city facility, located at 7272 S. Eagle Street just south of the intersection of Arapahoe and Jordan roads.

Centennial-based Saunders Construction served as the general contractor, completing the project in less than three months.

When city leaders met at the facility to hold a formal groundbreaking in October, City Manager John Danielson described how Centennial had paid cash in September 2012 to acquire the 9.2-acre property, Centennial’s first fully-owned public facility.

“The city council recognized that it’s time to stop leasing and renting facilities and own something,” said Danielson.

By acquiring the abandoned lumber yard for $2.75 million — well below market price — and consolidating its public works operations in one location, Mayor Cathy Noon said the city council was “trying to be innovative and seize opportunity.”

“Owning this facility instead of renting allows the city to be more efficient in providing services at a lower long-term cost,” Noon added.

The facility includes a 14,550-square-foot office building, a 12,500-square-foot maintenance facility, 15,000 square feet of covered bays for vehicles and an existing outdoor yard covering approximately five and a half acres, one and half acres of which is available for lease.

“Renovations to this site include a Traffic Operations Center (TOC) which allows the city the capability to monitor the status of traffic signals in real time — and make adjustments to better manage traffic,” said Allison Wittern, Centennial’s spokesperson.

“The TOC is currently connected to 15 signalized intersections and will be connected to an additional 48 intersections by the end of 2014. A secondary use of the TOC will be to serve as the City’s `Control Center’ during snowstorms,” Wittern said.

The Eagle Street facility has a new 5,000-ton salt storage dome and brine mixer to provide efficient operations during snowstorms, Wittern added.

Centennial Animal Services will have a holding area at the Eagle Street facility where customers may pick up their lost dogs.

“The opportunity to have Public Works, Code Compliance, Animal Services and the Citizen Response Center all housed in the same location definitely provides more efficient and effective services to our citizens,” Noon said. “Our public/private partnerships with CH2M HILL (Centennial’s contracted public works provider) and the Humane Society of the Pikes Peak Region continue to thrive, providing value to our community.”

The Eagle Street complex also has three meeting rooms available for rental by the community and nonprofit organizations. The community room has capacity for 100 people; a large conference room holds up to 14 people; and a smaller conference room can accommodate six people.

During the site renovations, 289 tons of asphalt was demolished and removed and 101 tons of concrete was also cleared out.

In addition, 600 cubic yards of new concrete was poured to complete foundations, curbs, gutters and sidewalks and 2,580 cubic yards of engineered fill soil was brought in to support structures, including the new salt dome, fuel tank and brine tanks.

The total renovation budget came in at $2.791 million, Wittern said, providing Centennial a fully functional facility for less than $6 million — and one that the city owns debt-free.

At the groundbreaking in October, Danielson called the city’s newest complex “a legacy project that will be here for 20 or 30 years. And the best part,” the city manager added, “is it’s paid for in full from day one.”